Rangaeris (Schltr.) Summerh.
  • (Schltr.) Summerh., Bull. Misc. Inform. Kew 1936: 227 (1936)


This is a synonym of Angraecinae Summerh.

General Description

Epiphytic or lithophytic herbs; stem short or long, branched or unbranched, covered in persistent leaf bases.Roots arising at the stem base, or along the stem opposite the leaves, usually stout.Leaves distichous, usually conduplicate, linear to oblong, unequally 2-lobed at the apex, coriaceous.Inflorescences arched or pendent, few- to many-flowered.Flowers usually white, turning apricot-coloured as they age.Sepals and petals free, subsimilar, spreading or recurved.Lip entire or 3-lobed, ecallose; spur pendent, slender with a narrow mouth.Column short or long, glabrous or puberulent, without a foot; rostellum bifid; anther cucullate, truncate at apex; pollinia 2, pyriform; stipites 2, linear or oblanceolate; viscidium oblong or cordate, relatively large.

Epiphytic or rarely lithophytic herbs. Roots emerging along stem opposite leaves, unbranched or rarely branching. Stem entirely covered with persistent leaf-bases. Leaves coriaceous, distichous, conduplicate, linear or oblong, unequally bilobed at apex. Inflorescence pendent or spreading to suberect, bracts longer than pedicels. Flowers usually white or yellowish. Sepals and petals free, subsimilar, spreading to recurved. Labellum entire or obscurely trilobed, ecallose; spur pendent, filiform, elongate from a narrow mouth. Column glabrous or puberulent, lacking a foot; anther cucullate, produced in front and truncate at the apex, pollinia two, pyriform, stipes two, linear or oblanceolate, viscidium oblong or cordate; rostellum bifid.

Epiphytic or rarely lithophytic herbs with short to long stem entirely covered with persistent leaf-bases; roots emerging along the stem opposite the leaves, rather stout, unbranched or little branching. Leaves coriaceous, distichous, conduplicate, linear or oblong, unequally bilobed at the apex. Inflorescences pendent or spreading to suberect, usually laxly few–several-flowered. Flowers small to relatively large, usually white or yellowish; pedicel and ovary longer than the bract. Sepals and petals free, subsimilar, spreading to recurved. Lip entire or obscurely 3-lobed, ecallose; spur pendent, filiform, elongate from a narrow mouth. Column short to long, glabrous or puberulent, lacking a foot; rostellum bifid; anther cucullate, produced in front and truncate at the apex; pollinia 2, pyriform; stipites 2, linear or oblanceolate; viscidium relatively large, oblong or cordate.

Morphology

Pollen of Rangaeris has not been investigated.

Ecology

Species of Rangaeris are epiphytes and occasional lithophytes in humid, wet, evergreen and semi-deciduous forests and woodlands from sea level to 2000 m.

Distribution

Rangaeris is a genus of six species confined to tropical and southern Africa.

Uses

There are no ethnobotanical uses reported for Rangaeris, although a few species are occasionally cultivated.

Literature

in Bull. Misc. Inform., Kew 1936: 227 (1936); in Kew Bull. 4: 435 (1949). —Senghas in Schlechter, Die Orchideen, ed. 3: 1099 (1986).

in K.B. 1936: 227 (1936) & 4: 435 (1949); Senghas in Schltr., Die Orchideen, ed. 3: 1099 (1986)

Distribution Map

 
  • Native distribution
Found in
  • Africa East Tropical Africa Kenya
  • Tanzania
  • Uganda
  • Northeast Tropical Africa Ethiopia
  • South Tropical Africa Angola
  • Malawi
  • Mozambique
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe
  • Southern Africa Cape Provinces
  • KwaZulu-Natal
  • West Tropical Africa Ghana
  • Guinea
  • Ivory Coast
  • Liberia
  • Nigeria
  • Sierra Leone
  • West-Central Tropical Africa Cameroon
  • Congo
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Gabon
  • Gulf of Guinea Is.
  • Rwanda
  • Zaire

  Bibliography

  • 1 Govaerts, R. (2003). World Checklist of Monocotyledons Database in ACCESS: 1-71827. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • 2 Original publication of Rangaeris. 1936, (1936).
  • 3 Pridgeon, A.M., Cribb, P.J., Chase, M.W. & Rasmussen, F.N. Genera Orchidacearum: Volume 6. Epidendroideae (Part Three). (Oxford University Press: 2014).

 Information From

Flora Zambesiaca
http://apps.kew.org/efloras/
Flora Zambesiaca. Published on the Internet; http://apps.kew.org/efloras/
Flora of Tropical East Africa
http://apps.kew.org/efloras/
Flora of Tropical East Africa. Published on the Internet; http://apps.kew.org/efloras/
WCS higher taxonomy
  • C All Rights Reserved
World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
WCSP 2014. 'World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. Facilitated by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet; http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/ Retrieved 2011 onwards
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